Cyclingnews TV   News  Tech   Features   Road   MTB   BMX   Cyclo-cross   Track    Photos    Fitness    Letters   Search   Forum  
Home

Recently on Cyclingnews.com


Mont Ventoux
Photo ©: Sirotti

Letters to Cyclingnews - September 24, 2004

Here's your chance to get more involved with Cyclingnews. Comments and criticism on current stories, races, coverage and anything cycling related are welcomed, even pictures if you wish. Letters should be brief (less than 300 words), with the sender clearly identified. They may be edited for space and clarity; please stick to one topic per letter. We will normally include your name and place of residence, but not your email address unless you specify in the message.

Each week's best letter gets our 'letter of the week' award. We look for for letters that contain strong, well-presented opinions; humour; useful information or unusual levels of sheer helpfulness.

Please email your correspondence to letters@cyclingnews.com.

Editor's note: We've held off awarding a 'Letter of the week' this week in light of the domination of our Inbox by letters about Tyler Hamilton and the new blood test.

Recent letters

Tyler Hamilton
The new blood test
Thomas Aberg
Tyler, USPS and Bruyneel
Rider of the Year
Senor Ochoa
True ambassadors of the sport
Tour de France, American style
Cycling and hip replacement

Tyler Hamilton #1

Tyler Hamilton is one of the most upstanding riders in the peloton. I, like anyone, was surprised to hear that two blood tests he had taken returned positive, one of which was still positive after the "conclusive" second test was performed. There is no way that Tyler is guilty. I'm not naive about the doping problem in Europe, but I would sooner believe that Lance Armstrong dopes than Tyler Hamilton. Not only do I believe that he wouldn't dope, he would never use someone else's blood. Using someone's blood is an extremely risky practice that even Tyler pointed out, if he were to dope, it would be asinine for him to use this method.

Fortunately, Hamilton will keep his Olympic medal since the sample from the Olympic B test was determined to have too few red blood cells to be conclusive.

To those who think he's guilty, bear in mind that the tests for homologous blood transfusions were just recently developed and Hamilton is the first person to be found positive under the test. It is possible, if not highly likely, that these tests were hastily developed so that they could be rolled out for the Athens Olympics. A hastily established test would most likely be inconclusive and inaccurate.

If Hamilton did in fact dope, which I don't think is the case, he still commands respect. The majority of the general public doesn't know the extent of the doping problem in cycling, so it would be hypocritical to come down on Hamilton and single him out. It would be devastating to American cycling and the peloton to lose such a rider.

Tyler Hamilton is a classy and honest man; he should be vindicated.

Patrick McGlynn
Boise, Idaho
Thursday, September 23, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler Hamilton #2

I am sure there are many letters, in support, in disbelief and simple sadness with regards to the announcement about Tyler Hamilton. I have a couple questions.

Why are only hearing about the Olympic sample now?

Tyler, if there was a "surgical intervention", as you put it, then simply get the surgeon, have him discuss the procedure, and let's be done with it. If the surgery is a private matter, then I am sure that you will be able to get some lawyer to draw up a letter of privacy, yet still show documentation to the UCI, and remove the cloud. Tyler, why aren't you doing that?

Nothing more need be said, because it is all speculation.

Michel van Musschenbroek
Buford, GA
Thursday, September 23, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler Hamilton #3

I fully believe that Tyler is innocent, and I'm very disappointed that Rihs and Phonak so quickly reversed their stance from Tuesday, suspending Tyler on Wednesday.

If you feel as I do, I would like to encourage you to contact Tyler's sponsors (especially those who are already considering dropping him) and let them know how you feel: that you stand behind Tyler 110%, and that you'll be very disappointed if they drop Tyler -- so disappointed that you may stop buying their products.

Long Live the Man from Marblehead!

Joy Davis
Rochester, NY, U.S.A.
Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler Hamilton #4

If Tyler Hamilton's B blood tests come back positive, then I say it is the testing organization that is corrupt. They are either guilty of using a test that is not reliable, or they are guilty of out-right corruption by creating false positives. Tyler is absolutely a guy who can push through adversity and has the integrity to let it all play out on the road, and I believe in him 100%.

I will warn every American youth away from professional and Olympic cycling because it will be apparent that whoever has an agenda to target cyclists is getting away with it. Of course, there are cyclists who indulge in doping and should be caught, but at the same time, this will prove that even innocent athletes can be successfully targeted. I hope that Lance Armstrong is watching this closely, because I would hate to see his legacy tarnished by corrupt officials who are willing to target innocent cyclists.

I also will be ashamed of any cyclist or cycling journalist who proceeds to attack Tyler because of this horrendous turn of events.

Bridgette Fleming
Niceville, FL
Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler Hamilton #5

I trust there are many cyclists who believe Hamilton's remarks. Why are the results being discussed before the second test results are finished? Why did the Vuelta and the Olympic tests surface at the same time? I find it hard to fathom that a top cyclist would take a homologous transfusion knowing that they are detectable.

The bigger issue is, are autologous transfusions common? If they are, could there have been some accidental contamination with another rider's blood? Or, did the testing and the testing equipment become cross-contaminated?

Autologous transfusions (your own stored blood) are illegal. However, the 1984 USA cycling team later admitted to this practice. There were no penalties given. Those comments certainly cannot be applied to every rider on the team. Without testing for this, can it be a punishable practice? If daily testing of riders would be necessary, how much blood would be drawn over a 3 week Tour? Too much for any rider to bear.

The other sad part of this news, by putting it in the headlines, it becomes a shadow over other riders. People start to question every result, every rider. It would be best if positive (or non-negative) test results are not made public until all the results are finalized.

Timothy Shame
USA
Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler Hamilton #6

If I was Tyler I would go to one of the top European hematologist inviting the press and UCI to go with me and observe every step from my blood being drawn, handled and tested.

I wish him all the best.

Michael G. Skardasis, M.D.
Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler Hamilton #7

Dear bicycle racing... Well, it was fun for a while but now that Tyler, a man of gentle honor, has been destroyed by the wolves of jealousy I feel compelled to boycott what once was a most beautiful sport. I have been riding a bicycle for over 50 years and have come to believe that this simple recreation has been ruined by commercialism, standard setting snob recreational riding clubs and glory seeking scientists bent on building their careers by destroying the careers of talented athletes. Tyler's poster of his struggle to win the l6th stage of the Tour is still on my wall and will remain there as an inspiration to never give up no matter what the adversity. He is my All American Hero. Maybe the rest of you want to muddle around in the morass of fingerpointing witchhunting but for now I think I'll climb on my $300 bicycle and go back to just enjoying the simple pleasure of moseying down my favorite rail trail.

By the way just what do you suppose Fausto Coppi used to enable him to thrash his competition?

Susan M.
Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler Hamilton 8#

Tyler Hamilton has been such an admired and squeaky-clean individual for so long that it is truly hard to imagine him doping. The blood tests appear to indicate two separate populations of blood cells, a finding compatible with doping. Could there be another explanation? Yes. There are two other possible explanations. I can't say how rare a likelihood they represent, because that knowledge is not, to my knowledge, available.

First, Tyler could be a natural chimera. A chimera is an individual who is genetically two people. Fully chimeric individuals are usually the product of two fertilized ova fusing into a single embryo shortly after conception. This could produce two colonies of blood cells.

Second, Tyler could be a product of microchimerism. During embryonic development, maternal and child blood cells can pass across the placenta, leading to double sets of blood cells which effectively set up lines of cells within each person that have been shown, in some cases, to persist for decades. Whether or not this is a real explanation, or whether Tyler is simply guilty, I have no way of judging, but I hope these possibilities are at least considered, especially in light of the newness of this method of testing.

Peter E. Pool
Reno, NV
Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler Hamilton #9

I don't know why everyone's so concerned that Tyler is suspected of using blood transfusions.

The answer is obvious to me: After his beloved Tugboat passed away during the Tour de France, Tyler decided to inject a little of Tugboat's blood as a way of making sure the spirit of his faithful little family member lived on.

All we have to do to clear up this mess is test Tyler's blood samples for canine DNA.

Stephen Howard
Seattle
Thursday, September 23, 2004

Respond to this letter

The new blood test #1

After reading Dr. Ashenden's interview and his journal article in Haematologica, I had several questions and concerns that most readers probably share. I am not a haematologist or even a researcher, my knowledge in research methodology is amateur at best. But, it seems that medical procedures and medications go through a more rigourous series of clinical trials before being considered acceptable to the public. The fact that Tyler Hamilton's IOC samples came out both negative and positive is also not evidence enough that this test is either effective or non-effective.

Like most readers, I like to know the information and fact behind the public statements. My concerns are as follow. First of all, is it prudent for both the UCI and the IOC to consider this article as evidence to the validity and reliability of the test? If so, do you believe that 25 subjects is an adequate sample size to base these assumptions? And, is a within-subject design (the same subjects tested before and after a transfusion) evidence enough to warrant the use of this test on an international sporting level, or would it be more prudent to use an experimental design with a true control group and a larger sample size (with adequate representation of gender, race, and other variables such as endurance athletes, non-athletes, power athletes, etc.)? Also, the article and the interview did not state actual reliability scores (although, from reading the article it appears that the assumption is that the test is 100% accurate). Are there more published studies that may attest to the reliability and validity of this test? If so, could you please provide those citations. As a disclaimer, my knowledge in research methodology is based on a research and stats 101 course I took twelve years ago as an undergraduate. So, my concerns may be way off the mark. I also admit that I desperately want to believe in Tyler Hamilton. The guy swore on his wife and dead dog that he was clean!

Ferdinand Arcinue
Los Angeles, California
Thursday, September 23, 2004

Respond to this letter

The new blood test #2

Dr. Michael Ashenden is disingenuous when he states categorically that "There's no way ... for an individual to have a mixture of red blood cells from different minor blood groups, other than for him to have had a transfusion."

It is well known that certain kinds of cancers and several different hematological diseases can produce two different sets of red blood cells containing different patterns of minor blood groups. In these people, even the "major" blood groups ABO and Rh can be affected (See, for example: Winters JL, Howard DS, "Red blood cell antigen changes in malignancy: case report and review", Immunohematology 17:1 (November 2001), available on line at http://www.redcross.org/pubs/immuno/171sm.pdf.)

Given that such things can happen in abnormal conditions, it is fair to ask how often they happen in otherwise normal individuals -- and especially, how often do they happen in competitive athletes such as elite cyclists? Obviously, you need to know how often such "false positive" cases occur in order to use the screening test reliably.

In addition, it is not possible to determine -- at least from Dr. Ashenden's published description of the test -- whether the test itself has a "false positive" rate due to factors other than whether the person being tested is truly "positive". Although the United States Anti-Doping Agency and the World Anti-Doping Agency had enough money to pay for the development of Dr. Ashenden's test, I suspect that it would cost them a lot more to do the kind of larger-scale study they would have to do to establish the true reliability of the test.

If I knew that I had never received a transfusion, but that I nevertheless tested "positive" using this new test, I would want to be carefully tested by some other means in order to confirm the "positive" result. I would also want to see some good data regarding the false positive rate of the UCI's test. This is the normal standard of practice for other kinds of medical testing such as screening for HIV/AIDS, and it ought to be the standard in elite cycling as well.

Richard Wilton, MD
Los Angeles, California
Thursday, September 23, 2004

Respond to this letter

The new blood test #3

The published report in Haematologica states 25 patients were tested for blood transfusions, and 22 of the transfusions were detected. The other 3 patients actually didn't have the transfusion after all, therefore the fact that these THREE patients were correctly identified means that the test won't give any false positives, or as they state: "These results show the potential for flow cytometry to identify illicit homologous blood transfusion in athletes, and SUGGEST the risk of false positives MAY be low. " (emphasis added). Because of a SUGGESTION based on only three people's blood, an Olympic Champion is under immense scrutiny defending his abilities and reputation.

Or maybe we should believe that they actually tested more people, but they are keeping secret about them. This is entirely possible since Ashenden is quoted as saying: ""Even if they read the article [Haematologica. 2003 Nov;88(11):1284-95] and found a match for the antigens mentioned - one in a million - there is no way they can get a match for the other 'mystery' antigens." Secret antigens. Unpublished results. Could somebody let this guy and the IOC know that that is not valid science?

"The first principle is that you must not fool yourself - and you are the easiest person to fool." These words from Richard Feynman should be hung over every scientists' desk as a constant reminder to not jump to conclusions so quickly just because you want them to be true.

John Spevacek, Ph.D.
White Bear Lake MN, USA
Thursday, September 23, 2004

Respond to this letter

The new blood test #4

Dr. Michael Ashenden is incorrect in saying that there is "no way" for an individual to have a mixture of red blood cells. A person could be a full chimera from birth, in which case he/she would look like they have blood from two people (mom and dad). Or they could be microchimeric as a result of a previous transfusion, which could have very well been legit. Considering the number of people that have had previous transfusions and the vast differences in people's immunology, it would be very difficult to standardize a titer for this type of thing. Its used in court to verify parental identity quite accurately because they can get blood from both parents to make sure of all the proteins the kid could have inherited (genetically, not necessarily as a chimera).

This test can establish potential cheats but calling it conclusive is a far cry from the truth. What it does say is that some people have mixed red blood cells/proteins/tags and some people have more than others, which could be cause by a huge number of events.

Researchers are supposed to conduct their research with a dispassionate interest. From what I've read about this guy and where his encouragement and money come from, I would say that this is hardly the case. They may have pushed an incomplete test to market.

Peter Pienkowski
USA
Thursday, September 23, 2004

Respond to this letter

The new blood test #5

John Stevenson's interview with Dr Michael Ashenden is highly suspect and extremely one-sided. While interviewing the father of the test in question, John Stevenson failed to ask any questions addressing shortcomings or potential problems with the test. In fact, there was no discussion regarding the probability basis for determining a positive test. In the blood, was conveniently published right about the time Cyclingnews started discussing the possibility of Australian rider Michael Rogers being bumped up to the bronze. We know you root for Aussie riders, but it's not an excuse to compromise your journalistic partiality.

I look forward to seeing additional articles and information that will shed light on all the facts surrounding the test in question.

David Francis
Thursday, September 23, 2004

Respond to this letter

Thomas Aberg

I obviously cannot comment on the truth of Mr. Aberg's claims to not having taken anything performance enhancing (it's a bit like Tyler Hamilton - you want to believe him, but...) but the rules on doping seem quite clear. A missed test is the same as a failed one - see the Rio Ferdinand story in British soccer. I also took part in the Masters World Championships and it was well known beforehand that (finally, as this was not previously the case and has long been demanded) the first three of each age group would be tested. In any case there have always been tests for randomly selected riders and it is the rider's responsibility to find out if he was picked out.

Most saddening is the fact that doping tests are necessary at all at such events. The participants are all old enough to know better, there is no money involved and still the need to deceive oneself and the competition overrides good sense and fair play.

Gary Weir
Frankfurt/Main
Thursday, September 23, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler, USPS and Bruyneel #1

[Previous letter]

And you don't think having Landis win the Vuelta is in Phonak's best interest (neglecting the idea that a Phonak rider was capable of winning)? Come on...Tyler was thinking only of himself and Phonak's future. Think of the sponsorship boost the team could have gotten with a Landis win. Why riders can transfer mid-season for next season is bizarre. Name another profession where you say, I've signed with so and so for next year and am continuing to work here.

Jonathan Smith
Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler, USPS and Bruyneel #2

You can't be serious - "be more respectful"? If anyone should have been more respectful, it should have been Tyler. I like Hamilton very much but for him to question the efforts of a "friendly" team toward their race leader in such a public fashion is absolutely beyond reproach. Last I checked the job of Team Director belonged to Johan Bruyneel. I could be wrong, maybe Johan is moving on and Tyler sees an opening in light of his recent troubles and possible career change. In all seriousness, Tyler should feel lucky that in a way he was only told to stick it, someone could have taken it upon themselves to stick it to him. Better words have not be spoken than that of Bruyneel, "..perhaps he should make sure his team is OK first".

Carlos Torres
New Jersey
Tuesday, September 21, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler, USPS and Bruyneel #3

I believe that Mr. Brayton is thinking a bit too emotionally about Tyler Hamilton's public anger in la Vuelta a España. I think that it shows us the reason that Tyler left US Postal to begin with. I think that down deep he didn't believe that anyone but Lance could get full support from Bruyneel.

Johann has shown himself to be an extraordinary director and well capable of estimating the capacity of his charges. And the results of the latest stages demonstrated him correct.

Let us assume that Johann had Triki bury himself for Floyd. Now in the later stages Beltran would have been much lower in the overall. He would have destroyed his chances for a decent finish in la Vuelta merely to leave Landis just where he is presently. And let us not forget that Beltran's points stay with the team whereas Floyd's will be going with him.

I think it's best not to pay a lot of attention to rider's anger during or shortly after a stage when they're being physically stressed. Often judgment and propriety are at a low ebb during these times and things are said that would otherwise not even been thought.

Tom Kunich
San Leandro, CA
Monday, September 20, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tyler, USPS and Bruyneel #4

What! You've got to be kidding, David Brayton. By what stretch of the imagination does Tyler have the right to yell at Triki Beltran to go faster in Stage 10 and then afterward to tell Demol that Postal is not supporting Floyd sufficiently? He's on another team! To express his opinion publicly and loudly like that shows he's clearly lost it. What gall! Yes, Floyd is foolishly going to ride for Tyler next year but that doesn't mean he has any say this year. What does he want, more UCI points for Phonak? If Tyler wanted more help for Floyd, why didn't he position himself in front of him and pace him up the mountain, if he could hang on, that is? Besides Floyd has repeatedly expressed gratitude for his team's work. Why would a "friend" so publicly call your teammates and team strategy into question like this. It makes those early morning meetings between Tyler and Floyd on the Phonak bus highly suspicious. Next year's team makeup should never effect this year's racing. In fact, riders need to scrupulously avoid even the appearance of that.

Are you watching the Vuelta, David? Triki was turning himself inside out on stage 10, as he has every mountain stage. Anyone could see that. No wonder Triki was surprised by Tyler's rudeness. And then who came in ahead of Floyd on Stage 12? Triki Beltran. So Postal's strategy of protecting both Floyd and Triki doesn't seem far off at all.

I'm frankly sick that Tyler, because he's a "nice guy," keeps getting a pass for all his silliness. And this one was beyond silly.

Claudia W. Harris
Utah, USA
Friday, September 17, 2004

Respond to this letter

Rider of the Year #1

How about an unconventional pick: the 35-year-old Cofidis rider from Belgium, Peter Farazijn, started the Tour de France on 2 hours' notice after poor Matty White crashed during his warmup.. and he made it all the way to Paris. I hope he got a sweetheart bonus for that remarkable, although unheralded, impromptu performance.

Jeffrey Jones,
USA
Sunday, September 19, 2004

Respond to this letter

Rider of the Year #2

I agree with Raymond Martin (and others) about Rebellin - he's had a great year. Anyone know why Ballerini left him off the Olympic squad? Any votes for Petacchi? 20+ wins and counting, plus the Giro record!

I don't think anyone would disagree with Oenone Wood for the Female Rider of the Year, though Petra Rossner has been very strong of late.

Eddie Bethel
Nassau, Bahamas
Friday, September 17, 2004

Respond to this letter

Rider of the Year #3

How about Gunn-Rita Dahle? I know she's a woman and a mountain biker but Olympic World and world-cup champion all in the same year! Hot and dry or cold and wet she still wins, a true champion.

Barry R Taylor
Benidorm
Friday, September 17, 2004

Respond to this letter

Senor Ochoa

Thanks for the continued coverage of Sr Ochoa's racing exploits. It is great to see him riding so well. I hope that his personal life is as rewarding as his life on the bike.

Kim Viner
Laramie Wyoming
Sunday, September 19, 2004

Respond to this letter

True ambassadors of the sport

[Previous letter]

Remember that time (I think it was in the Giro) when Cipollini needed to dump an empty bottle - he looked around and then tossed it straight into the hands of a kid at the side of the road, actually during the race! and if you spend long enough watching the big (and not so big) tours you'll see similar things happening all the time. A lot of these guys haven't forgotten how they started out by watching; power to them.

Barry R Taylor
Benidorm
Friday, September 17, 2004

Respond to this letter

Tour de France, American style

Justin Quinn made some good points. But what he misunderstands is the view most American fans have. (Just most, not all, folks.)

Yes, many are there to cheer Lance Armstrong and Lance only. This is more out of nationalism and patriotism than celebrity status. They would cheer Hamilton or Julich just as loud . (We would have to get rid of our 'Texas, bigger than France!' shirts for a more appropriate 'Mass., snobbier than France' slogan.) True, many cycling fans do not feel such strong nationalism, myself included. They may root for Cipo or Petacchi, not caring for what country they were born in. As for most Americans, they only know of Lance for two main reasons.

First, cycling is seen about as often as events like bobsledding here. Very little is said in mainstream sports news. Sports Illustrated only has a page for the Tour champion IF the winner is an American. Otherwise, nothing. Many newspapers only list the overall leaders in the race, saying nothing of the daily events or stage winner. Lance, like Lemond, is the only active cyclist they know. Until recently, the only coverage from the media was a weekly 60 minute review of the Tour de France. Thus, the blame should really fall on the US media.

Second, since the media coverage is minimal, few Americans understand cycling and the importance of stage victories. No importance at all is placed on the stage wins, especially when the peloton finish with the same time. You might hear:"Why were those guys trying so hard to win when they all got the same time?" Even in this years Tour finish, many were puzzled that Lance lost a minute on the last stage. "Must have been the champagne" They may see a clip of a stage winner celebrating what has been a life-long struggle to win a stage, at any cost, even if only a second ahead of a charging peloton. Then they will say," Why does this guy seem so happy? He is an hour behind Lance." The sad part of this? When Lance retires, cycling will once again be forgotten here.

Timothy Shame
USA
Friday, September 17, 2004

Respond to this letter

Cycling and hip replacement

[Previous letter]

My left hip joint was replaced by surgeon Andrew Shinar, M.D. at the Vanderbilt Joint Replacement Center, Nashville, Tennessee on August 9, 2004 and I resumed riding bikes on the road four weeks later on September 4th. Prosthesis is titanium with a ceramic ball and plastic socket. It does not wear out - in the lab! I do not understand how preparation was accomplished and the prosthesis put in place with only two small incisions at my hip. Well, muscles hurt afterward! I grimace imagining how my hip was dislocated in preparation for surgery. On September 19th, one day after my 61st birthday, I rode seventy miles with a group of youngsters at an average speed of eighteen mph and I shared some of the work. My cumulative mileage is approaching three hundred. For those who don’t know this, Florida, is generally flat. I admit that climbing any incline right now is challenging and I get gapped often but I close those gaps. My spin is back and a cadence of ninety plus easy to maintain. Oh, if anyone worries about falling, I did! Flush on the outside of the new hip. Of course falling is discouraged but it is important to understand that after total hip replacement we are not fragile. I don’t wish I had THR sooner. It was a quality of life decision. The risk of doing collateral damage to my back and knees by shifting weight bearing from my hip was a factor in my equation.

X-rays were taken and evaluation done by Dr. Shinar yesterday at Vanderbilt. My next appointment is June 2005.

Larry Gies
Orlando Florida, USA
Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Respond to this letter

Recent letters pages

  • September 17 letters - Alto de Monachil, Tour, technology, predictability, La Vuelta is the race!, Tyler, USPS and Bruyneel, Frank, Trent Klasna retires, True ambassadors of the sport, Tour de France, How good is VAM, Super Mario, Alternative criterium formats, Axel, Eddy and the Olympics, Rider of the Year, The coming of the 3 kg bicycle?
  • September 10 letters - Olympic Madison lemon wedges, Axel, Eddy and the Olympics, The coming of the 3 kg bicycle? Rider of the Year, Tour de France, Rider wages, Alternative criterium formats, Chris Horner, Judith Arndt, John Coates
  • September 3 letters - Posties at the Vuelta, Rider of the Year, Tour de France, Chris Horner, Scott Sunderland, What is going on in Belgian track cycling?, John Coates , Judith Arndt, Criterium in Charlotte, Embrace technology, Rider wages
  • August 27 letters - Olympic road races, Kudos, Medals, John Coates must go!, $125,000 Criterium in Charlotte, Judith Arndt, Death wobbles, Pedaling furiously, Rewriting history, IAAF getting tough?, Rider Wages, Tour de France, UCI Bike Weight Restrictions, Mactier's reaction, Yiddish Cycling Terms
  • August 20 letters - Rewriting history, Arndt should have been relegated, Crowds at the Olympic road races, Olympic road races, Racing with a concussion?, Sponsors and Olympics, Hamilton, Julich & CSC, True ambassadors of the sport, Death wobbles, There are other races, CSC tactics, Shmenges, The debate begins, Tour de France, UCI Bike Weight Restrictions, Pedaling furiously
  • August 13 letters - Bush vs. Kerry, Brits at the track, Nicholas Roche, Olympics and Lance, UCI Bike Weight Restrictions, Pedaling furiously, Armstrong vs the hour, Armstrong vs Simeoni, David Millar, Greg LeMond's comments, No romance in France, The debate begins, The power of a team, The Tour 2004
  • August 6 letters - John Coates must go!, Witch hunting in the 21st century, Greg LeMond's comments, Bush vs. Kerry, David Millar, Adam Bergman
  • August 6 Tour letters - If you had told me before the Tour..., Looking to the future, The Tour 2004, The power of a team, The debate begins, Fan behavior, The anti-Lance attitude at Tour 2004, TdF blood bath, No romance in France, Italian investigators, I hope to see the Giro at last, CSC tactics, Armstrong vs Simeoni, Armstrong vs Klöden, A Legend
  • July 30 Tour letters - The Tour 2004, The Debate Begins, Armstrong vs Simeoni, Italian investigators, Ullrich and T-Mobile, Fan behaviour, The supporting actors, The power of a team, The anti-Lance attitude at Tour 2004: A French view, TdF blood bath, TdF 2004 ITT profile, Tour Favourites, Most inspiring ride of the Tour, Postal for la Vuelta? Poor prize money, LAF Bands CSC tactics, A Legend
  • July 30 letters - Adam Bergman, Greg LeMond's comments, Drugs in cycling, Doping reporting, David Millar, Museeuw and getting doored
  • July 16 Tour letters - The TdF saved my life, A sad day for Hamilton, T-Mobile's choices, LAF Bands, Mario Cipollini vs. Jaan Kirsipuu, Playing by the rules of the game, Robbie McEwen and sprinters, Ullrich v. Riis, Stage 3, Stage 4 TTT, Stage 5 - 12 minutes?
  • July 16 letters - Greg LeMond's comments, Drugs in cycling, Museeuw and getting doored, Human evolution and cycling, David Millar, The French affair, Why thank Lance?, Canadian TV
  • July 9 letters - Drugs in cycling, David Millar, Cadel Evans, John Lieswyn, Human evolution and cycling, Museeuw and traffic, Canadian TV
  • July 9 Tour letters - Stage 5 - 12 minutes?, Stage 4 - The team time trial & those rules..., Stage 3 - Should the leaders have waited?, Jan Ullrich / Lance Armstrong
  • June 25 letters - Chris Horner & US Olympic Trial, The French affair, Cadel Evans, The battle for the commentary podium, Tour contenders, Will stage four decide the Tour, A thank you letter for USCF, USADA, AAA/CAS, Museeuw doored - his fault?, Beloki's allergy medication, Discovery Channel kit, Green jersey dog fight, Iban Mayo's uphill TT bike, LA Confidential, Tour-Giro double, Why thank Lance?, Searching for Bill Clawson
  • June 18 letters - A thank you letter for USCF, USADA, AAA/CAS, LA Confidential, Green jersey dog fight, Iban Mayo's uphill TT bike, Museeuw doored - his fault?, Why thank Lance?, Will stage four decide the Tour?, Beloki's allergy medication, Discovery Channel kit, Does Zabel go?, Jan Ullrich / Lance Armstrong, Rochelle Gilmore, Tour-Giro double, Cycling and hip replacement
  • June 11 letters - Will stage four decide the Tour?, How Ulle will win this year's TdF, Climbers' Jersey, Rochelle Gilmore, Simoni and "the impossible", Cycling among top five tested sports, Rousseau's au revoir, Jan Ullrich / Lance Armstrong, Giro, Does Zabel go?, Days of racing needed to prepare, Cunego's Giro victory, Chris Horner, Robbie McEwen, Cycling and hip replacement
  • June 4 letters - Giro, Cunego's Giro victory, Damiano Cunego, Cunego in stage 18, Team tactics at the Giro, Simoni trying the impossible?, Robbie McEwen, Pavel Tonkov, Jan Ullrich, Chris Horner, Cycling among top five tested sports, Cycling and hip replacement
  • May 31 letters - Au revoir Lance, Cunego's Giro victory, Pavel Tonkov, Serguei Gontchar, Dr Ferrari's Giro stage 13 analysis, When the boss has to go..., US Postal makes waves?, Robbie McEwen, US Postal stops sponsorship, US Postal sponsorship replacements, Jan Ullrich, Iban Mayo & the Tour, Tour de Georgia, Chris Horner, Orbea Orca
  • May 21 letters - US Postal sponsorship replacements, Chris Horner, Fred Rodriguez - persistence pays, Donuts. Is there anything they can't do? , McEwen's sprint, US Postal stops sponsorship, Soooper Mario, Jesus Manzano, Jan Ullrich, Orbea Orca, Trying to contact John Auer
  • May 14 letters - Tour de Georgia, Chris Horner, McEwen's sprint, US Postal stops sponsorship, Seating requirements, Aero Helmets, A different Wheaties box, George Hincapie, Jan Ullrich, Skip Spangenburg, Cycling and hip replacement, Afscheids Criterium Johan Museeuw, indeed, Timing, Davide Rebellin's remarkable feat, Orbea Orca
  • May 7 letters - A different Wheaties box?, Afscheids Criterium Johan Museeuw, Jan Ullrich, George Hincapie, Doping and team doctors, Davide Rebellin's remarkable feat, US Postal stops sponsorship, Top 5 at TdF 2004 - not Mercado!, Two Men and a Dog, UCI Pro Tour, Cycling and hip replacement, Timing
  • April 30 letters - Doping and team doctors, Davide Rebellin's remarkable feat, Spring Classics slam, Mercado - the time is now, USPS stops sponsorship, UCI Pro Tour, George Hincapie, Gilberto Simoni, Jan Ullrich, Harmonic motion, Tour de Georgia, Cycling and hip replacement, Timing
  • April 23 letters - The rainbow curse, Verbruggen is the problem, Gilberto Simoni, George Hincapie, Jan Ullrich, Questions on doping, The doom of doping, Floyd the future of USPS?, Dope testing, Magnus Backstedt, Roger Hammond, Gear ratio chart
  • April 16 letters - Floyd the future of USPS?, Magnus Backstedt, Jan Ullrich, David get outta there!, Cofidis and the Tour, Michelin Tubeless at Roubaix, Manzano, Vale Muur van Geraardsbergen, The Doom of doping, Hincapie, Javier Oxtoa, U.S. Excitement, Radios, Roger Hammond, England or Wales?
  • April 9 letters - Vale Muur van Geraardsbergen, Manzano, The Doom of doping, Amore e Vita, Boonen, Two Speed Cycling?, A welcome end to pro cycling?, Stripes, Karma, Wesemann's setup, Roger Hammond, USPS sponsorship, Javier Oxtoa, April Fool's, UK to Geneva route?
  • April 2 letters - A welcome end to pro cycling?, Manzano & doping, Finding the right team?, USPS sponsorship, WADA and Armstrong, Karma, Bjarne Riis, Is Tobias Steinhauser a real person?, Javier Oxtoa, Max number of champions in a TdF, Radios, Stripes, Chamois: real or synthetic?
  • March 26 letters - A cycling fan's prayer, Manzano, USPS serendipity, UCI statement post Jesus Manzano, Jonathan Vaughters doping response, Moser comments about "updating" the MSR, WADA and Armstrong, Parsimony, Drugs, Genes, US MTB racing, Bjarne Riis, Iban Mayo, O'Grady & Milan Sanremo, The 'World' Cycling Series, Javier Oxtoa, Max number of champions in a TDF, Radios, Sean Kelly and the 1992 Milan-San Remo, We're not sprinters, Is Tobias Steinhauser a real person?, An old cycling top
  • March 21 letters - Bjarne Riis, Radios, US MTB racing, WADA and Armstrong, The "World" Cycling Series, Doping, Iban Mayo, Armstrong's brakes, Fixing Cipo's problem, Max number of champions in a TDF?, Sean Kelly and the 1992 Milan-San Remo, The most fashionable men of the peloton, We're not sprinters, Jame's Diarrhea, Bobby Julich Interview
  • March 12 letters - Radios, WADA and Mr Armstrong, Speculation about Genevieve, Doping, Aero helmets, Brad McGee, Chubby Lance?, How many more have to die?, Iban Mayo, Lance's Performance, Marco Pantani - who is guilty?, Rabobank and U. S. Postal, There's more to life than sprinting, Tour without Kelme?
  • March 5 letters - Speculation about Genevieve, Brad McGee, Doping, How many more have to die?, Tour without Kelme?, Aero helmets, Chubby Lance?, Climbers and sprinters, Fixed gear, Mt Wallace climb, Stage 3 of di Lucca, TdF04 travel itinerary?, Tour de France 2004
  • Letters Index – The complete index to every letters page on cyclingnews.com