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Interbike show

Las Vegas, USA, September 26-30, 2005

Photography

Part 24

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Images by James Huang/Cyclingnews

  • A closer look at the Titus Racer-X suspension assembly reveals new carbon fiber seatstays and revised aluminum chainstays. The carbon fiber rocker arms are carryover from last year.
  • In the all-mountain category Titus offers the up-to-five-inches-of-travel Moto Lite. It features Titus’ Horst Link design, enough chainstay clearance for a 2.6 tire and comes in aluminum (shown here), titanium and Exogrid (ti/carbon mix) versions.
  • The Isogrid Ultralite is Titus’ lightest road frame and uses Isogrid carbon and titanium tubing.
  • Isogrid doesn’t just add a titanium end to a carbon tube. The carbon is actually cured into the titanium, plus Titus adds a couple of cutouts to provide some mechanical hold between the two materials as well. You can’t see it, but the carbon is also internally reinforced, sort of like old Columbus SLX tubing used to be.
  • Take one titanium tube add one part laser…. now where’d I put that carbon?
  • Oh, right, there it is. Here’s Titus’ Vuela featuring a complete Exogrid tubeset.
  • Want a Titus road bike but are a little short on funds? Try a Modena on for size.

Images by Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews

  • Hanging on a scale, the Titus Racer-X weighed in at only 19 ½ pounds. Titus says they lightened the bike partly with component choices but also with a new hydro-formed chain stay and carbon seat stay; losing a quarter pound in the rear end alone.
  • The 2006 Titus FCR Mountain cross-country hardtail.
  • Titus’ big-hit bike the Super Moto, has five linkage options to accommodate pretty much any rear shock on the market. It also features an oversized OnePointFive system compatible head tube to fit the newer, stiffer long-travel forks. The bike ships with 1-1/8-inch head cups and Titus says they’ll offer a half-degree offset 1-1/8-inch cup to give buyers setup options up to 7-1/2 inches of travel.
  • Scott USA designed adjustability into the seat mount assembly of their High Octane big hit bike.
  • Scott’s High Octane is new for 2006.
  • Thomas Frischknecht won the Marathon World Championship on a Scott all-carbon Scale cross country hardtail. Showing faith in the hardtail format, Scott offers something like thirteen different work ups of the Scale, from almost $6,000 down to the $500 and less price point. The Scale 10 (shown here) comes with the 80mm Fox 80, SRAM X10 and Avid components. The one-step-higher Scale Limited comes equipped with Shimano XTR.
  • Scott throws their new six-inch Ransom into the all-mountain category.
  • A close up look at the core of the Ransom with the six-inch Fox 36 Talas.
  • got a serious junior racer in your family? Scott offers this 24-inch wheeled hardtail (RC Jr Team Issue) equipped with a very adult set of components (Shimano XT, FSA cranks).

Part 23

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Images by James Huang/Cyclingnews

  • The Maxxis Courchevel mixes three different rubber compounds in a single road tread. Hope you like orange…
  • The workhorse Columbiere tire is now finally available in a 25c casing width. Finally, there is acknowledgement that some of us live in areas with bomb craters for pavement.
  • The new CrossMark sort of combines Maxxis’ successful Larsen TT and Mimo tread designs into one tire. Developed with Christoph Sauser, the CrossMark promises super fast rolling that still drives and corners well. From previous experiences with the Larsen treads, this one looks like a winner to me.
  • The versatile Ignitor tread pattern is now available in a more useful 2.1” casing width.
  • The mud-specific Medusa is also now available in a 2.1” casing for situations when cutting down to the base dirt with a skinny mud tire is either impractical or impossible.
  • Yikes, where’d the knobs go? This tire might not have much grip, but at 310g, it’ll likely go like stink in the right conditions.
  • This DH tire is still so new that it doesn’t even have a name yet. What it does have, however, is a triple compound tread that promises outstanding braking bite with stable cornering characteristics with knobs that won’t chunk off in rough stuff.
  • Nope, it’s not exactly a new tire from Michelin, but it sure is sticky. Don’t plan on racing RAAM with it, though, unless you plan on carrying a spare set to swap out along the way. Those crazy kids competing in the upcoming Red Bull Road Rage, though, might want to check out a set…
  • Three tread compounds - one tire. An elastic base is paired with a durable center tread and grippy shoulders for low rolling resistance and good cornering grip.
  • The new Table Top is intended as a versatile tire for both urban and dirt jumping environments and is the first offering in a new Timo Pritzel line of tires from Schwalbe.
  • The capable Stelvio Evolution is now available in a 25c casing width for a little more cushion and a bigger footprint for improved cornering capability.
  • Kenda’s lone new off-road tread pattern for ’06 looks to be fast rolling and grippy. I’ll take two, please.
  • WTB showed off a new large-volume, short-knob version of their popular Weirwolf tire.
  • Watch out for tubular MTB tires in the near future. Reynolds is just about ready to release their ultralight carbon fiber MTB tubular rims, and these off-road tubulars from Tufo will likely make for a super light and fast combination.

Part 22

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Images by James Huang/Cyclingnews

  • The shape of SRAM's lever hoods seemed comfortable enough on the trainer, but we'll see for sure later on. And contrary to speculation, there is just a single lever used to initiate shifts in both directions.
  • The frontal view of SRAM's new road shifters highlights the radical shape they take in the name of ergonomics.
  • A reinforcing brace is neatly integrated into SRAM's new upper-level road caliper and should minimize flex for a solid feel at the lever.
  • SRAM's new crankset is its first all-carbon offering that doesn't incorporate an alloy spider. The external-bearing Giga X Pipe is carried over.
  • The new front derailleur uses cold-forged aluminum links with widely spaced pivots to minimize cage deflection during shifts. Speaking of the cage, it looks to be steel rather than alloy for durability.
  • A glance at the cable path underneath the rear derailleur suggests that SRAM may be doing something a little different with their cable pull ratio. Word has it that it's not quite along the lines of their 1:1 system from their mountain bike componentry, though.
  • The rear derailleur - Like the front derailleur, the rear looks to be constructed mostly of forged alloy. Of course, though, there is a healthy smattering of carbon tossed in for good measure.

Images by SRAM

Images by Mark Zalewski/Cyclingnews

  • Where it all began - SRAM's shifters made their first appearance at the USPRO criterium championships in August, but had been under development for two years before that.

Part 21

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Images by Gerard Knapp/Cyclingnews.com

Part 20

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Images by Park Tool

Images by Cyclingnews

Images by Cateye

Images by Assos

  • Assos gets casual - the Swiss clothing experts are branching out into very stylish off-the-bike wear. This stuff is currently so new that only catalogue photos of it exist!
  • More of the Assos range for off-the-bike use - yes, there's even an Assos pillow for those moments when you get caught out without a blouse. Ahem.

Part 19

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Images by James Huang/Cyclingnews.com

  • The new Cosmic Carbone Pro front hub now incorporates a carbon fiber center section bonded to aluminum flanges.
  • The new Mavic Cosmic Carbone freehub body is apparently now made of titanium. This significantly reduces weight relative to Mavic’s traditional steel construction but should prove much more durable than aluminum.
  • The new all-carbon rim cuts a bunch of weight as compared to last year’s aluminum-plus-carbon fairing construction. Rim depth is a wind-cheating 52mm.
  • I bet those yellow-on-black graphics probably look pretty cool when they’re spinning really, really fast…
  • All of Fulcrum’s rear wheels use their 2:1 Two-to-One spoke arrangement which uses twice as many spokes on the drivetrain than on the non-driveside to equalize spoke tension.
  • Fulcrum’s new Racing Light uses an ultralight clincher-compatible carbon fiber rim.
  • With a label this big, Fulcrum certainly doesn’t want anyone to think that their new deep-section Racing Speed wheels were made by Campy or anything…
  • Just in case your friends don’t believe you, they say ‘Carbon’ right on the rim.
  • The folks at Look had Thor Hushovd’s Look 585 on display, complete with some interesting wheels…
  • Yes, they say Dura-Ace on them, they’re carbon tubulars, and they’re an awful lot deeper than their “officially” released WH-7801-Carbon wheels. No, Shimano won’t say anything about them yet, and no, you can’t have them yet.
  • The new 7801-SL wheels use a new Scandium rim with an offset rear spoke bed.
  • Shimano very cleverly integrates a counterweight into its new carbon rim to balance out the valve.
  • The solid outer wall of the new 7801-SL rim not only makes it stronger and stiffer, but also eliminates the need for rim tape and facilitates tubeless compatibility… that is, whenever that tubeless stuff becomes commercially available.
  • Like Mavic’s Ksyriums, the spoke nipples thread directly into the rim. Unlike the Ksyriums, though, Shimano chooses to weld a little widget on to the inside of the rim rather than thread the rim itself.
  • Topolino’s new carbon-rimmed wheelset does away with their trademark carbon and Kevlar composite spoke construction. Bladed stainless steel spokes are used in the new model to make the wheels more aerodynamic.
  • A single spoke runs uninterrupted from one side of the rim to the other. The hub is still mounted in the centre of the wheel, of course, but the hub doesn’t encounter nearly as much stress as in traditional wheel construction. This apparently allows Topolino to make their carbon hubs much lighter since the spoke end isn’t actually anchored there.
  • Carbon Ti’s chainrings mate a 6/4 titanium outer section with a carbon fibre centre. The rings honestly aren’t much lighter than a standard aluminum ring, but they are reported to be much more rigid and offer 20,000 mile longevity. In a pleasant departure from other exotic chainrings, the Carbon Ti rings are also pinned and ramped for good shifting.
  • What? Fox makes a 29er-specific version of their 36 fork? Well… not quite.
  • The unique appearance of Lightweight’s rear disc wheel isn’t just for show. The disc is actually constructed much like the rest of their line, and the black lines are tensioned carbon spokes. The white stuff is actually just filler material and serves only an aerodynamic function, not a structural one.
  • Lightweight uses freehub internals from their German neighbors at Tune (who are themselves no slouches in the weight department, either).
  • The folks at Lenzsport have devised a clever offset front hub that allows you to run a 29er wheel in a standard 26” fork. No, it doesn’t look light, but it does open up the fork possibilities a tonne for the 29er crowd.
  • Surly showed off some very extreme-looking off-road unicycles using their superwide Large Marge rim and three-piece chromoly cranks.

Part 18

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Images by James Huang/Cyclingnews.com

Part 17

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Images by Jonathan Devich/epicimages.us

Part 16

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Images by Tim Maloney/Cyclingnews.com

  • Pictured here on Lance Armstrongs's special 10//2 bike used on the final stage of the 2005 Tour De France, Bontrager's new Aeolus high profile carbon fibre wheels, developed with Steve Hed, may be among the fastest hoops on the planet. The 65mm cross section and torroidal shape slice the wind and weigh in at a reported 1630 grams per pair.
  • Ivan Basso and Team CSC are proudly sponsored by Bell Helmets, and with helmets now manditory in all ProTour races, all the time, this is a crucial choice for any team. CSC's choice is Bell's top of the line Sweep R, a light (292 grams) and effective In-Mold helmet with 20 vents and Bell's GPS Fit system.
  • Bell's Sweep XC has been upgraded for 2006 with a new Variable Position Visor (VPV) up front, which allows 15 degrees of vertical adjustment. Add the great ventilation from 20 large vents, GPS retention system and In-Mold tecchnology and Sweep XC has what it takes to conquer any mountain.
  • Established in 1954, proven ever since and their wall of fame on display at Interbike paid testament to legendary auto racers like dragster Don Garlits, auto racer Dan Gurney and cyclists like Thor Hushovd.
  • Bell's state of the art downhill and BMX helmet is named Ballistic, designed for full-face protection. With 15 vents, this '06 Ballistic can also come with cool new crypto-outerspace graphics.
  • For 2006, Blackburn's Air Tower 5 CF floor pump has been upgraded to reach 100psi in a mere 10 strokes. With improved Dual Stage, Dual Stroke internals and a lightweight carbon fiber barrel and gauge face, the Air Tower 5 CF can reach a maximum pressure of 160psi.
  • Castelli calling in winter. A cold white winter ride calls for a cool white Castelli winter jacket, in this case the Carbon 5 jacket in their proprietary Resistex Stratosheer fabric.
  • Renowned for their YPRO bib shorts, Castelli has been upgraded for 2006 with a new scallop-shaped Alchemia short panel, Vibra lycra on the long leg cuffs, fast-drying ProSecco lycra for the body, and stretch net bibs.
  • Castelli's Teseo windvest has WH Ripstop fabric, reflective inserts and a full front zip.
  • Sportful's new Mach 1 WS Race jacket features WL Gore's Aggon 60 Windstopper, the lighest ever version of the famous fabric. With 117g sensitive Lycra and a stretch waist for easy closure, this is the perfect jacket to start with on those cool days, then fold up and put in your pocket.

Part 15

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Images by Tim Maloney/Cyclingnews.com

Images by Nike Cycling

Images by Trek USA

  • In 2006, Trek's Remedy provides a solution for "All-Mountain" mountain bike riders, with a lightweight component spec package and 5" or 6" of balanced travel.
  • Trek's Jack platform is for big time big sky riding.

Images by LeMond Racing Cycles

Part 14

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Images by Jonathan Devich/epicimages.us

Images by Sinclair Imports

Part 13

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Images by Jacob Csizmadia/CeramicSpeed

  • Yikes, these things are pricey, but allegedly worth every penny. Tyler Hamilton paid 1500 Euros out of his own pocket for enough bearings to outfit a bike and a half. According to the manufacturer, running ceramic bearings instead of steel ones can drop a full second per kilometer in an individual time trial. Apparently the entire CSC team is now so-equipped.

Images by James Huang

  • FSA external bottom brackets equipped with ceramic bearings will have red-anodized cups so that everyone knows why you keep pulling away during your local group ride. Pulleys that come with ceramic cartridge bearings pre-installed will also be available.
  • The ceramic bearing on the right is not only much lighter and impervious to corrosion, but also much more resistant to impact. Ceramic bearings earn their reduced friction due to much tighter roundness tolerances as compared to even the best steel bearings.
  • The Chaos is the smallest pack in Camelbak's Outlaw series and is available in both black/grey and tan, if you're more interested in blending in with Las Vegas desert backgrounds...
  • The Mayhem is a medium-sized hydration pack that includes a 100 oz. toughened polyurethane bladder and enough storage room for your full-face helmet and full complement of pads.
  • More stuff! Must carry more stuff!!!
  • Top-mounted media pocket is ideal for housing a small video camera body (with remote unit attached to your helmet, of course!) or your digital music player.
  • The new Theory frame fits smaller faces and features a trim frame with adjustable nosepiece and rubberized temples. The new Ignitor lens is reported to highlight shadows and heighten color definition in mixed lighting conditions.
  • Adjustable nosepiece should accommodate a wide variety of nose shapes and sizes.
  • Prescription lenses directly replace stock lenses so there are no clumsy inserts to deal with. Prescription lenses are available in similar tints to standard non-prescription lenses.

Images by Gerard Knapp/Cyclingnews.com

  • BMC's general manager shows the innovative 'Time Machine'. The one TT frameset can be used by the vast majority of riders, he said.
  • The front end of the patented-new 'Time Machine' being offered by BMC.
  • Nicknamed 'The Nurse', due to its white, red and black livery, not to mention use of the Swiss national emblem, this is BMC's new track bike that the company is hoping to place under leading track riders in 2006.
  • Sheila Moon (L) exhibiting her very feminine line of women's cycling clothing that still possessed all the good technical qualities cyclists expect.

Images by Sheila Moon/www.sheilamoon.com

Part 12

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Images by Mark Zalewski/Cyclingnews.com

Part 11

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Images by Steve Medcroft/Cyclingnews.com

Part 10

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Images by Mark Zalewski/Cyclingnews.com

Part 9

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Images by James Huang

Part 8

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Images by Mark Zalewski/Cyclingnews.com

Part 7

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Images by Tim Maloney/Cyclingnews.com

Part 6

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Images by James Huang/Cyclingnews.com

Part 5

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Images by James Huang/Cyclingnews.com

Part 4

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Images by Cyclingnews/Steve Medcroft

Part 3

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Images by James Huang/Cyclingnews.com

Part 2

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Images by Cyclingnews/Steve Medcroft

  • The Zirkel is Moots' replacement for the Smoothie XC in '06. The main changes are a new configuration for the rear shock and a taller rear triangle.
  • A closer look at the Moots Zirkel.
  • Moots developed this sliding rear dropout as part of the ongoing development of adjustable chain tension in singlespeeds.
  • A full-on look at Moot's Uno singlespeed.
  • Surly's Pugsly, which comes equipped with 4" tires, got a lot of attention from riders. "Someone would take the bike out and two people would follow them back to the booth," said Surly product manager Nick Sande.
  • The custom-made Pugsly tyre is actually 3.7 inches, to be precise. Surly says the ability to run super-low pressures (as low as 5 PSI) means the bike floats over terrain previously meant for suspension bikes.
  • The Pugsly's tyres are apparently great on snow, too.
  • Rocky Mountain pro Andreas Hesteler was on hand at the Rocky Mountain booth talking to riders testing their new Slayer50 six-inch travel freeride bike.
  • With "six and six" inches of travel, Andreas Hestler said that Rocky Mountain has put out a bike that's 'pedalable' but is super fun on longer downhills. Will we see it in NORBA Super D races in 2006?
  • Industry insiders lined up outside the Giant MTB demo tent to get a chance to ride Giant's new three-inch cross country bike, the Anthem.
  • Hutchinson held a mechanics competition at Outdoor Demo: the 2005 "get it on" tyre mounting Challenge. Les Welch from Harrisonburg, Virginia (R) won the final.
  • Dahon makes a steel-framed 26" hardtail that uses Ritchey's break-away clamping, so that it folds into a piece of luggage you can check-in on any airline.
  • The lower half of the Ritchey break-away system involves a removeable collar and cables that seperate just above the bottom bracket. The second breaking point is at the seattube/top tube junction.

Part 1

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Images by James Huang