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Dauphiné Libéré
Photo ©: Sirotti

North American Handmade Bicycle Show, March 5, 2009

Chris King is now in full swing
Photo ©: James Huang
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A 1 1/8" steerer tube is squeezed into a head tube
Photo ©: James Huang
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Chris King makes many of the frame fittings in-house
Photo ©: James Huang
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In fact, nearly all of the frame's smaller bits
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Stainless steel reinforcing rings
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Chris King will offer standard Cielo frames
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The full-blown 'Cielo by Chris King' frames
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Chris King actually started building frames long along
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Cielo will offer both 'sportif' and 'cross models.
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This 'cross bike was built specifically for U-brakes.
Photo ©: James Huang
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Why buy someone else's frame fittings
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Sure, why not.
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Chris King also debuts a new line of internal-cup headsets
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Snow bikes were popular at this year's NAHBS.
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Sycip has long championed segmented fork construction.
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This bike also featured an integrated bar and stem.
Photo ©: James Huang
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Bare stainless steel provides a nice visual contrast.
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Just in case you need to haul a little extra gear.
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Get around airline baggage fees
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The couplers add some weight
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This red townie doesn't show off Sycip's full capabilities
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The front rack is perfectly sized for a six-pack of bottles…
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…and yes, of course there's a built-in bottle opener.
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This ANT commuter could easily blend into
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This front rack could certainly handle a sizeable load.
Photo ©: James Huang
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And in case you need more carrying capacity there's a rear one, too.
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This is just about the only identifying mark on an ANT bike.
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A stylish way to get to your destination of choice.
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Ok, so maybe there are a couple of other places
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It's no carbon racer but it's beautiful in its singleminded dedication to function.
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Of course, there's always black if you prefer your ANT
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Wooden rack slats were a virtual must-have at NAHBS.
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Japanese builder Kimori brought a pair of wild-looking truss bikes.
Photo ©: James Huang
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Kimori gave this truss bike a parallelogram-linkage front fork.
Photo ©: James Huang
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The pivots are tiny but widely braced
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Kimori bolts the stem directly to the top of the shock shaft.
Photo ©: James Huang
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The rear uses decidedly tiny tubing.
Photo ©: James Huang
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A simple elastomer stack handles rear suspension duties.
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Tiny ball joint pivots are used out back.
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The anti-29er!
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A similarly designed fork graces the front of the MTB version.
Photo ©: James Huang
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Got a track bike without brake mounting holes?
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Kimori offers this interesting solution that clamps on to the fork blades.
Photo ©: James Huang
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The rear brake clamps on as well
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Kimori says the reduced friction from this coated titanium track cog
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This isn't the first fixed-gear adapter we've seen
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Kimori also showed off this magnesium stem.
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Separate male/female hardware
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Steel tubing makers such as Reynolds
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Dedacciai is bringing back its Zero 1 tubeset.
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DeRosa's top models are still carbon fiber…
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…and with lines like this it's perhaps no surprise.
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But even DeRosa is reporting increasing sales
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In addition to the lugged Neo Primato,
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The Corum features an unusually curvaceous integrated head tube.
Photo ©: James Huang
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DeRosa doesn't simply add bearing cups to the ends of its titanium head tube;
Photo ©: James Huang
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